Griot Storyteller Media

It is vital to examine the behaviors and attitudes which lead to seclusion and restraint and ways to break the path before incidents of patient escalation begins.  It is also helpful for staff consider ways to successfully reduce or eliminate the practice.  Examples of these may include:
•    Increasing access to “creature comforts,” including food,
     restrooms, fresh air, music, and human contact

•    Providing comfort and sensory rooms, and comprehensive
     orientation of incoming service recipients on the use of those
     modalities

•    Assisting all incoming service recipients in developing and
     applying their own crisis plans

•    Reducing visual and audible cues of seclusion and restraint
•    Increasing accountability to top management, including
      required debriefings with senior management and tracking of  
      all incidents of seclusion and restraint by initiating party


    "Terrific tool..."

  • It is vital to examine the behaviors and attitudes which lead to seclusion and restraint and ways to break the path before incidents of patient escalation begins.  It is also helpful for staff consider ways to successfully reduce or eliminate the practice.  Examples of these may include:
    •    Increasing access to “creature comforts,” including food,
          restrooms, fresh air, music, and human contact
    •    Providing comfort and sensory rooms, and comprehensive
         orientation of incoming service recipients on the use of those 
         modalities
    •    Assisting all incoming service recipients in developing and
         applying their own crisis plans
    •    Reducing visual and audible cues of seclusion and restraint
    •    Increasing accountability to top management, including
         required debriefings with senior management and tracking of  
         all incidents of seclusion and restraint by initiating party


     BETTERis designed to advance our clinical practices to a higher level and help move people out of institutions into better and fuller lives within the larger community.


The goal is to use this drama-centered teaching tool in a way that tells a more complete story.  Additionally, the goal is to reflect the human and sometimes extraordinary connections between staff and people served that so often promotes healing.  Our belief is that self-examination as offered by “BETTER” is a tool for   changing attitudes, behaviors and practices. 

 
Background
In spite of the many years of effort by both state and federal authorities, seclusion and restraint in many mental health settings (emergency services, state psychiatric and
private hospitals and other institutional facilities, including special schools, etc.)
continues to be frequent. It is widely accepted that the seclusion and restraint
experience is:

  • traumatic (to the person being secluded or restrained, to staff involved in the action, to witnesses, and to the larger environment), with frequent long-term emotional trauma to all participants,
  • dangerous (with risks of physical injury to both victim, observers, and staff),
  • counterproductive, with seclusion and restraint sometimes leading to a person receiving less of the services and supports they need, and resulting in longer stays in restrictive settings, and
  • unnecessary (many settings have reduced their use of these actions by 80%-90% through concerted efforts, without adverse impacts on the delivery of care).



 The trauma of seclusion and restraint can be replaced with real therapeutic actions.  The short film “Better” One Woman’s Journey In and Out of Seclusion and Restraint is a raw and authentic portrayal of seclusion and restraint shown from the consumer’s perspective.  “Better” guides caregivers in examining harmful practices and challenges them to seek alternatives.

   "Excellent film."

"Wow! What a thought provoking video..."*

  Overview of Better

"Great learning film..."

* Feedback comments gathered from national convention of advanced practice nurses.